Thresholds and Setbacks among the Pro-Life movement

Thresholds and Setbacks among the Pro-Life movement
February 25, 2019 No Comments » Local Politics, News Javier Castro

 Thresholds and Setbacks among the Pro-Life movement

by Javi Castro

 

Students display the Holy See, Don’t Threat On Me and US flags during the 2019 March for life in Washington D.C.

The annual March for Life occurred on a frigid January day in the nation’s capital, but that did not deter over 600,000 participants to weather the elements and the criticism for advocating for the little ones. Although the March started in 1974, the topic of abortion has been quite relevant in recent times. With a conservative supreme court, the chances of overturning Roe vs. Wade are within the movement’s grasp.

In NYS however, the pendulum could not be farther from the March for Life’s movement. A recent bill (S240) has been signed into law that grants mothers the ability to abort their babies just short of birth. This came as a swift blow to conservative New Yorkers, Pro-lifers, and the archdiocese.

Black and Hispanic babies are aborted significantly higher than their counterparts and account for the most minority deaths per year in the US. So much in fact, that it is considered by the pro-life movement to be the highest single factor of societal marginalization towards a group of people.

Luckily, President Trump’s sense of urgency has not waned in the face of criticism. Just three days after taking office, Trump ordered the government, through the Mexico City Policy, to halt any funding to Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) that promote abortion as a method to family planning. Additionally, under a video message to the 2019 March For Life participants, President Trump vowed to veto any pro-abortion bill that arrives at his office, saying “If they send any legislation to my desk that weakens the protection of human life, I will issue a veto and we have the support to uphold those vetoes.”

In addition to hundred of thousands young people of different faiths, backgrounds, and class that attended the march, a few noteworthy individuals were Dr. Alveda King and Vice President Mike Pence.

If you enjoyed the article and would like to see more, become a member or donate to the RNHA today! The Republican National Hispanic Assembly is a not for profit organization. We are an independent media institution funded by small donors. We depend on you to continue to produce quality content. 

About the Author:

Javi C. is a Dominican immigrant from The Bronx that has been advocating for veterans, immigrants and conservative Bronxites for the past six years.  He earned a B.A. from John Jay College and often enjoys running. You can follow his latest storytelling project on Instagram by following RightatthefØrk.

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Javier Castro Javi C. is a Dominican immigrant from The Bronx that has been advocating for veterans, immigrants, and conservative Bronxites for the past six years. He earned a B.A. from John Jay College and often enjoys running and attending baseball games. You can follow his latest storytelling project on Instagram by following RightatthefØrk. If you enjoyed the article and would like to see more, become a member or donate to the RNHA today! The Republican National Hispanic Assembly is a not for profit organization. We are an independent media institution funded by small donors. We depend on you to continue to produce quality content.

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